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Project Charlie (Chemical Abuse Resolution Lies in Education)

Quality level: 3

Summary

Project Charlie is a life skills drug prevention programme targeted at primary school children. It is a broad-based approach incorporating training in resistance skills, peer selection, decision making and problem solving, self-esteem enhancement and the provision of information.

Type of intervention:
prevention
Sub-area:
universal
Setting:
school
Type of approach:
Target group:
children/young people
Age group:
6-11
Annual coverage:
500
Substances addressed:
tobacco, cannabis, opiates, alcohol, ecstasy, cocaine and derivatives, amphetamines, methamphetamines, inhalants/solvents
Evaluation type:
outcome evaluation, impact evaluation
Country:
United Kingdom
Start date:
01/01/1990
End date:
01/02/1996

Overall objective

To delay the onset of drugs and to limit the eventual drug use in terms of amount, frequency and situations.

Abstract

Project Charlie is a life skills drug prevention programme targeted on primary school children. It is a broad-based approach incorporating training in resistance skills, peer selection, decision making and problem solving, self-esteem enhancement and the provision of information. The research study: A long-term follow-up was undertaken of pupils exposed to Project Charlie at primary school, to assess its impact on drug related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour at secondary school. Children who were exposed to Project Charlie in 1992 were followed up in 1996 and compared with children who did not receive Project Charlie.·Due to the way that the programme was implemented, a number of different comparisons could be made between groups of pupils: Comparison 1: One sample of 44 pupils had been randomly assigned by class to either receive Project Charlie or act as a 'control', and receive no drugs education at primary school (34 of these pupils were successfully followed up in 1996). This part of the evaluation compared 20 Project Charlie children with 14 controls. Comparison 2: A second sample of 24 pupils who received Project Charlie were matched with 24 pupils who did not receive the programme (42 pupils were successfully followed up in 1996). Thus 21 Project Charlie pupils were compared with 21 matched controls. Comparison 3: The above samples were added together and an additional, large comparison sample of 233 pupils added, consisting of all the pupils who happened to be in the follow up pupils' secondary school classes in 1996. The findings: An initial evaluation was carried out in 1995 to assess the immediate impact of Project Charlie on the children involved, and this was followed-up in 1997 with a second evaluation to examine the programme's more long-term effects. The follow-up report found there to be significantly lower levels of experimentation with tobacco and illegal drugs amongst those children who had received Project Charlie than amongst the control group.

The PDF contains the full intervention description including additional contact information.

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Page last updated: Friday, 20 January 2012