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Maudsley Addiction Profile

User Information

Acronym:

MAP

Author/Developer / Address:

John Marsden, Michael Gossop, Duncan Stewart,
David Best, Michael Farrell, & John Strang
National Addiction Centre/Institute of Psychiatry
Addiction Sciences Building
4, Windsor Walk
London, SE5 8AF, UK
J.Marsden@iop.kcl.ac.uk

Publication dates:

1998

Description / Type of Assessment:

The MAP is a brief, structured interview for treatment outcome research.

Primary use / Purpose:

MAP was designed to assess the following domains with people with drug and alcohol problems. It is designed as a core research instrument and to be a resource for treatment services wishing to undertake outcome studies.

Domains measured / Life Areas / Problems Assessed:

The MAP measures problems in four domains: substance use, health risk behaviour, physical and psychological health, and personal/social functioning.

Population:

Adults.

Administration / Completion Time:

Approximately 12 minutes.

Scoring Procedures:

Scoring procedures are specified in the User's Manual.

Scoring Time:

2-3 minutes.

Credentials/Training:

Not necessary. See instructions manual (included as a relevant study).

Source of Psychometrics:

The manual.

Languages:

English. MAP has been translated to French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

Availability/Inquiries:

The authors. (See address above).

Price:

The MAP is a public domain research instrument and may be used free of charge for not-for-profit applications. Users are asked to cite the following reference when using the instrument : Marsden, J. Gossop, M. Stewart, D. Best, D. Farrell, M. Lehmann, P. Edwards, C. & Strang, J. (1998) The Maudsley Addiction Profile (MAP): A brief instrument for assessing treatment outcome, Addiction 93(12): 1857-1867.

Practicability / usefulness:

The MAP have been designed explicitly for outcome research purposes. All of the problem measures can be repeatedly administered at points during and after an index treatment episode. Changes in these measures can then be attributed to treatment or other processes over the intervening period. A key principle behind the MAP is that, as a core instrument, other measures and items can be added as required according to clinical, operational or research requirement. For example, a measure of drug dependence could be included, as well as questions concerning drug use history.

Comments:

The manual of this instrument is included in the EIB as a relevant study about the MAP.

Page last updated: Wednesday, 14 July 2004