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Inventario de Procesos de Cambio (in Spanish)

User Information

Acronym:

IPC-AH

Author/Developer / Address:

Trujols, J.; Tejero, A.; Casas, M.;
Unidad de Conductas Adictivas.
Programa SANT PAU-CITRAN.
Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau.
Avenida San Antonio Maria Claret 167.
Barcelona (Spain).

Publication dates:

1997.

Description / Type of Assessment:

IPC-AH is a 40-item self-report.

Primary use / Purpose:

IPC-AH is based on the Processes of Change Inventory (DiClemente and Prochaska, 1985) for smokers. Its purpose is to assess the use of the several processes of change by opiate misusers.

Domains measured / Life Areas / Problems Assessed:

The ten processes of change identified by Prochaska and DiClemente in their theoretical model for change addictive behaviours.

Population:

Adults.

Administration / Completion Time:

Approximately 7-8 minutes.

Scoring Procedures:

Score of items on each change processes are added to obtain a score for these ten change processes.

Scoring Time:

2-3 minutes.

Credentials/Training:

Not necessary.

Source of Psychometrics:

See relevant studies.

Languages:

Spanish.

Availability / Inquiries:

The authors.

Price:

Free.

Practicability / usefulness:

To assess the frequency of using ten different processes of change among opiate misusers in treatment.

Comments:

The IPC-AH can be used as a research tool. Further studies are necessary before using the instrument for clinical purposes.

Relevant Studies
Consistencia Interna y Eficacia Discriminativa del Inventario de Procesos de Cambio para Adictos a la Heroína.
Trujols, J.; Tejero, A.; Casas, M. Estructura Factorial, Consistencia Interna y Eficacia Discriminativa del Inventario de Procesos de Cambio para Adictos a la Heroína. Adicciones, 9, 13, 331-345. 1997.

For the first time in a sample of opiate addicts, the processes of change dimension of the Prochaska and DiClemente's transtheoretical model of change is tested. A self-report (the Processes of Change Inventory for Opiate Addicts, IPC-AH) for assessing the use frequency of the processes of change was administered in a sample of 178 heroin addicts. Its reliability, validity and discriminative efficiency were studied. An alpha reliability coefficient of 0.87 was obtained, A principal component analysis of the instrument revealed a three component solution which accounted for 34% of the variance. Comparisons between abstinent and non-abstinent subjects revealed significant differences (p<.0001) in two of the ten processes being considered: Counterconditioning and Stimulus Control, Theoretical and clinical implications of the results are discussed.

Processes of Change Assessment in Heroin Addicts
Tejero, A.; Trujols, J.; Hernández, E.; Pérez de los Cobos, J.; Casas, M. Processes of Change Assessment in Heroin Addicts Following the Prochaska and DiClemente Transtheoretical Model. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 47, 31-37. 1997.

The processes of change dimension of Prochaska and DiClemente's transtheoretical model of change is tested in a sample of opiate addicts for the first time. A self-report (The processes of Change Inventory for Opiate Addicts, PCI-OA) designed to assess the frequency of processes of change was administered in a sample of 178 addicts in order to study its reliability, validity and discriminative efficiency. An "alpha" reliability coefficient of 0.87 was obtained. A principal component analysis of the measure revealed a three-component solution which accounted for 34% of the variance; "contemplation and preparation processes', "processes of action" and "processes of the final part of the action phase and maintenance". Comparisons between abstinent and non-abstinent subjects revealed differences (P< 0.0001) in two of the ten processes considered: Counterconditioning and stimulus control. A stepwise discriminant analysis yielded a linear combination of eight processes that correctly identified 78% of the total sample. Theoretical and clinical Implications of the results are discussed, suggesting that the PCI-OA can be considered as a useful self-report instrument for identifying which processes of change are being used by a specific opiate-dependent patient.

Page last updated: Wednesday, 14 July 2004