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Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis

User Information

Author/Developer / Address:

Alfred S. Friedman, Ph.D., and Arlene Terras (Utada), M.Ed.
Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment
4081 Ford Road
Philadelphia, PA 19131
(215) 877-6408. (215) 879-2443 (fax)

For French version please contact Monique Bolognini, especially if you are interested in the DVD on the French version of the ADAD (Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis). It presents the whole material available on this instrument: questionnaire, manual, training video and scientific papers on its use in clinical and research contexts. The DVD is available at the SUPEA - Research unit in Bugnon 25 A - 1005 Lausanne, Switzerland or by email to Monique.Bolognini@chuv.ch

Publication dates:

 

1989

Description / Type of Assessment:

 

ADAD is a 150-item instrument for structured interviewer administration that produces a comprehensive evaluation of the clients and provides a 10-point severity rating for each of 9 life problem areas. Composite scores to measure client behavioural change in each life problem area, during and after treatment, can be calculated. Only 83 items of the 150 ADAD items are used for measuring change, for post-test, follow-up tracking in an evaluation of clients after treatment and for the evaluation of treatment outcome. These 83 items are circled on the ADAD form. A computerized version for administration of ADAD, which has been developed by the Target Cities Research Project at the University of Akron in Akron, Ohio, is now available on disk. This software version of ADAD provides a narrative summary of the data collected from each individual client that is intended to facilitate report writing and treatment planning.

Primary use / Purpose:

ADAD was designed to assess substance use and other life problems, to assist with treatment planning, and to assess changes in life problem areas and severity over time.

 

Domains measured / Life Areas / Problems Assessed:

     

Medical
School
Employment
Social relations
Family and background relationships
Psychological
Legal
Alcohol use
Drug use

Population:

 

Adolescents.

Administration / Completion Time:

 

45-55 minutes.

Scoring Procedures:

 

Each life problem area is scored for problem severity on a 10-point scale. Collectively, these scores are referred to as the Interviewer Severity Ratings and comprise a comprehensive adolescent life problem profile.
The interviewer's ratings usually reflect the judgment of the severity of the problems based on the historical perspective of the client's behavior and life conditions over a period of time that is longer than the most recent 30-day period covered by the items that are included in the formulas for deriving the composite scores.
Mathematically derived composite scores (based on a formula for weighting selected item scores) can be used to assess changes in problem severity over time. These scores are independent of both the interviewer's clinical judgment of the "severity" of each life problem area, as well as the adolescent client's problem severity and treatment need self-ratings.

Scoring Time:

 

Less than 10 minutes.

Credentials/Training:

 

A 1-day training session is recommended. As an alternate minimal training method, a training videotape is available at a cost of $25.00. Technical assistance for this training procedure is available at no cost by telephone.
The videotape shows an actual ADAD interview which can be used as (1) a simple model for the administration of the instrument, and (2) a means of developing proficiency with assigning severity ratings (by comparing the trainee's severity ratings with those of the trainer).

Languages:

 

English and French (Euro-ADAD is also available in Dutch, Swedish and Hungarian).

Availability / Inquiries:

 

Alfred S. Friedman, Ph.D., and Arlene Terras, M.Ed. See address above

Price:

ADAD is in the public domain. In response to inquiries about ADAD, the following items are sent free of charge: a copy of ADAD instrument; a copy of the original journal paper about the ADAD which describes its development, its psychometric properties, and its normative sample (see relevant studies: Friedman, A.S.; & Utada, A.).

Practicability / usefulness:

 

ADAD can be used to assess substance use and other life problems, to assist with treatment planning, and to assess changes in life problem areas and severity over time.
ADAD produces a comprehensive evaluation of the client and provides a 10-point severity rating for each of nine life problem areas. Composite scores to measure client behavioral change in each problem area during and after treatment can be calculated. Only 83 items of the 150 ADAD items are used for measuring change: posttest, followup tracking in an evaluation of clients after treatment, and evaluation of treatment outcome. These 83 items are circled on the ADAD form.
Although ADAD was originally developed for use with adolescents in substance use disorder treatment settings, it has proved useful as a general assessment tool for adolescents in school settings, youth social service agencies, mental health facilities, and facilities and programs within the criminal justice system.

Comments:

 

A special feature of ADAD is three problem checklists in the medical, school, and family sections. These lists, which require only a yes or no response from the adolescent, enable the interviewer to gather a considerable amount of information from the youth in an easy and efficient manner. The items on the problem checklists were selected from longer lists of items of an open-ended instrument that had been administered to several different populations of adolescent substance users. The items that were found to predict treatment outcome to the most significant degree were selected for inclusion in the ADAD.

Relevant Studies
A method for diagnosing and planning the treatment of adolescents drug abusers
Friedman, A.S.; & Utada, A.A method for diagnosing and planning the treatment of adolescents drug abusers (The Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis (ADAD) instrument). Journal of Drug Education, Vol. 19 (4). 285-312. 1989.

This study describes the development of the Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis (ADAD). A series of validity and reliability tests are described. The standardization sample consists of 1,042 clients admitted to six outpatient programs (n=683), three residential, nonhospital programs (n=157), and three hospital programs (n=202). Good two-year rater interrater reliability (r=0.85-0.97) was demonstrated for the interviewers' severity ratings of the nine life problem areas. Good test-retest reliability was shown for interviewer severity ratings (r between .83 and .96) and for the composite scores (r between .91 and .99), except for the employment of life problems area (r=.71). Adequate concurrent (external) validity (r between .43 and .67) was established for all but two life problem areas (by correlating with scores obtained on other previously validated instruments that purported to measure the same life problem area). The exceptions were the medical and social relations life problem areas; obtained correlations were lower. ADAD may not be appropriate for use with Native Americans.

References to French version
Bolognini, M., Plancherel, B., Laget, J., Chinet, L., Rossier, V., Cascone, P., Stéphan, P., & Halfon, O. (2001). Evaluation of the Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis instrument in a Swiss sample of drug abusers. Addiction, 96(10), 1477-1484.

Chinet, L., Plancherel, B., Bolognini, M., Holzer, L., & Halfon, O. (2005). Adolescent substance-use assessment: methodological issues in the use of the ADAD (Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis). Substance Use and Misuse, 40(3), 405-425.

Holzer, L., Kölbl Tchemadjeu, I., Plancherel, B., Bolognini, M., Rossier, V., Chinet, L., & Halfon, O. (2006). Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis (ADAD) vs. Health of Nation Outcome Scale for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) in clinical outcome measurement. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 12(5), 482-490.

Laget, J., Sofia, C., Bolognini, M., Plancherel, B., Halfon, O., & Stéphan, P. (2006). Use of a multidimensional assessment tool in a psychiatric adolescent care unit. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 12(5), 549-558.
Article in "Addiction"
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Article Validation française
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Page last updated: Friday, 12 January 2007