European Drugs and Addiction library

Review of European-Drug Emergencies Network (Euro-DEN) training package for non-specialist workers to assess acute recreational drug and new psychoactive substance toxicity in night-time economy environments

Summary: 

The initial management of acute recreational drug and new psychoactive substance (NPS) toxicity is often by non-specialists working in the night-time economy. The aim was as part of the European Drug Emergencies Network (Euro-DEN) project to pilot training of these workers in multiple European countries. The guidelines and training were well received by night-time economy workers in three European countries and improved confidence in managing acute recreational drug/NPS toxicity. Appropriate national and European bodies need to look at wider dissemination of this work.

Keywords: 

harm reduction

Abstract

This abstract is provided here as a convenience only. Check the publisher's website (if available) for the definitive version.

Aims
The initial management of acute recreational drug and new psychoactive substance (NPS) toxicity is often by non-specialists working in the night-time economy. The aim was as part of the European Drug Emergencies Network (Euro-DEN) project to pilot training of these workers in multiple European countries.
Methods
Following evaluation of training needs, guidelines and training package were developed. Night-time economy workers in London, UK; Pa¨rnu/Tallinn, Estonia; and Oslo, Norway participated in a 1- to 2-h interactive case-based training session. Participants completed a questionnaire pre-/post-training to assess confidence in managing acute recreational drug/NPS toxicity and evaluate the training package/guidelines.
Findings
98 (London: 42; Oslo: 39; Pärnu /Tallinn: 17) completed both pre-/post-training questionnaires. Participants felt significantly more confident in managing someone unwell following classical recreational drug use compared to NPS (5.6 ± 2.9 vs. 4.3 ± 2.7, p50.001); this difference persisted after the training (7.6 ± 1.9 vs. 6.9 ± 2.0, p50.001). 147 (London: 42; Oslo: 88; Pärnu/ Tallinn: 17) completed the post-training evaluation; the training session and the guidelines were rated 8.2 ± 1.4 and 8.7 ± 1.7, respectively (out of 10).
Conclusions
The guidelines and training were well received by night-time economy workers in three European countries and improved confidence in managing acute recreational drug/NPS toxicity. Appropriate national and European bodies need to look at wider dissemination of this work.